Monthly Archives: April 2014

Dear God. If in the End

Dear God. If in the End

we had no internet
no hot water in the kettle
no books riddled with notes
or bedclothes yellowed by the lamplight

If in the end you were as close to me as I am
to knowing every star,
marking each with naked eye,
reciting cinematic names and vectors

If in the end I’d hauled the wood
you burned for every prostitute
or preacher, every wandering soul
a minstrel in our bed

If in the end my body spelled
the only name that mattered,
and you wouldn’t read it, would not see
your sign in limbs and skin

If in the end our days fell impotent
and soft, no clam’ring mess
in back of us, only a sliding –
only a mouth open, a swallow

I’d curl myself around you
my chin between your shoulder blades,
a pressing: navel, buttocks
thigh to thigh and arm to arm,

a smell of static disavowal
soaking through my robe like ink
and I would say, I love you, love you
washed out, paling into pink.

 

 

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you’re not that busy.

just omg so busyMeet the Busy Brag: social media’s hate-worthiest addition to the human experience. I am important, cry the crafted tweets and updates,

because busy. Did you guys happen to notice I’m busy? If not, here are some pics about my busy. It’s a good thing you’re not as busy as I am, or you’d miss my social media updates re: busy. I won’t see YOUR pics or posts, because busy. In demand. Hashtag overwhelm. Hashtag cost of success.”

…From my latest for Ploughshares Literary Magazine, in which I punch the busy-brag in the face.

Because human busyness ≠ human value.


For centuries, artists have asked, explored, and hypothesized about what gives life value. When creatives give in to the notion that we’re essential and significant primarily when busy, we answer the question before we can ask it. In the process, we defy the humanistic ideals at the root our artistic efforts.

You’re not that busy. (AND you’re valuable.)

(*gasp*)

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Ghost children, empathy, and easter. 3 Monday quotes.

HOORAY MONDAY QUOTESI’ve lately been reading a wide swath of whatever, and apparently refusing to share any of it because… cohesion.
So in lieu of a blog post that would make all these come elegantly together, below are the quotes I’m saving from a few works that may or may not be awesome on the whole:

From Education’s culture of overwork is turning children and teachers into ghostsby Melissa Benn for the Guardian, April 16 2014:

Educational reform now largely equals intensive schooling: early-morning catch-up classes, after-school clubs, longer terms, shorter holidays, more testing, more homework. The trouble is, the human body and human communities do not flourish through being flogged. Families don’t benefit from frenetic rushing. They simply forget who each other is, or could be, which is where the real problems begin.

From The Most Underrated Skill for Creatives? Empathy, 99U.
In which author Jake Cook dares suggest that art is actually better when you think about your audience: rather than sweeping them to one side for the sake of introspective, hermit-like creative binges.

It is much easier to push through your creative blocks when you can actually visualize why your audience needs…
It’s not about creating a portfolio piece. It’s about helping… Working this way, with real people in mind, is much better than staring at a blank canvas or whiteboard and giving it your best guess.

Alain de Botton’s The Philosopher’s Mail featured the article, Easter for Atheists” this past weekend: a quick writeup of reasons for taking interest in the holiday’s roots — even if one doesn’t believe in a God, or that Jesus was one, or that he (god or not) rose from dead:

Among the last words Jesus was meant to have said before he died was the plea: ‘Forgive them, they don’t know what they are doing.’ Herein lies the fascinating suggestion that cruelty i sa symptom of a lack of love and understanding, but it is not the ultimate truth about anyone. People who enjoy bringing pain to others are themselves traumatized, rather than inhuman. They are not fully in command of themselves. The jeering man in the crowd is himself the victim of past horrors, deserving — if we can find it in our hearts to understand — pity rather than rage.

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